Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston joins Jessica Linn and Joshua T Berglan for a powerful conversation about the educational system, generational trauma, parenting tips and the mental health and the role educators should play in our children’s lives.

Meet Dr. Eccleston

“My name is Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston (aka The NeuroDiverse Teacher). My areas of passion, expertise, and research focus on examining adolescent mental health impairments in the education environment, and I am well versed in the needs of the neurodiverse brain.

Additionally, my professional experiences include in-class teaching at the secondary levels and designing and directing a specialized program for secondary students with mental health needs.

I have a Doctor of Education in Mind, Brain, & Teaching from Johns Hopkins University, a Master of Science in Special Education from Johns Hopkins University, and a Certificate in Educational Leadership and Administration from Hood College. Currently, I am an Adjunct Professor at Towson University in their Secondary and Special Education Graduate Programs and work as an Education Consultant to families and education technology companies. I am a National Board-Certified Teacher, Exceptional Needs Specialist, and hold an Advanced Professional Educator Certificate.”

Thank you for being a part of A Conversation with Joshua T Berglan, Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston & Jessica Linn on the Live Mana Network!

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Learn more about Dr. Eccleston by clicking here

Joshua T Berglan, aka The World’s Mayor, is a voice for the voiceless and is driven to elevate the passion, purpose, and mission of those he serves. Joshua is the Chairman of the Live Mana Worldwide Foundation & Live Mana Network, Shock-Jock Evangelist, International #1 Best Selling Author for the Book “The Devil Inside Me“, a Producer, and Filmmaker. Joshua is an expert in the future of media and loves supporting others in helping make their dreams come true.

 

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Joshua T Berglan, aka The World’s Mayor, is a voice for the voiceless and is driven to elevate the passion, purpose, and mission of those he serves. Joshua is the Chairman of the Live Mana Worldwide Foundation & Live Mana Network, Shock-Jock Evangelist, International #1 Best Selling Author for the Book “The Devil Inside Me“, a Producer, and Filmmaker. Joshua is an expert in the future of media and loves supporting others in helping make their dreams come true.

 

TRANSCRIPT 

 

Joshua T Berglan
Hello. I know Welcome to a conversation with Joshua T berkland. And I brought my lovely wife with me today because this subject is something that we’re both very, very passionate about. I keep on using my camera being there. And I move this over here. Yeah, you know, this is this is professional broadcasting, it’s fine this, folks. Anyway, thank you so much for being here we are on the live monitor network, you can find us by downloading our apps. But the easiest way to find it, whether it’s the App Store, Apple TV, Roku, Amazon Fire, you can just scan that QR code there in the corner, and you will find links to everything that we’re doing is at the mana worldwide Foundation, all of our apps for the network. And there’s some other fun stuff there as well. So thank you so much for being here today is a very special guest. And as I said, I invited, invited my wife to be a part of it, because we both have very, very passionate about mental health that also, we’re very passionate about our youth. And we have an amazing doctor here, who is just doing some incredible work and you guys are just, I think you’re gonna really love this conversation. The only thing you want to say,

Jessica linn
Well, I mean, the youth is, is my thing. It’s my what I’ve education and experience. And so I’m very passionate about it. And I can’t wait to hear what you have to say.

Joshua T Berglan
I’m going to tell you a little bit about our guests. So the neurodiverse teacher, Dr. Kristen Eccleston feels passionate that everyone should see how amazing they are, especially our youth. However, years of working in education and advocacy have shown her how hard feeling different from everyone else is for students that are neuro divergent, and are struggle with mental health needs. I was this kid, I was this kid. And the reason why I think you chose we chose me to marry me because I was that, you know, challenging child that wasn’t a grown man’s body. Well,

Jessica linn
and I know I can name so many kids that are like this that I used to, to work with. And I mean, it’s it’s not talked about enough. People don’t realize that they need extra help that they’re not just bad kids. No. And

Joshua T Berglan
I think that we’re all created extraordinary. And I tweeted this yesterday, because you know I love Twitter so much is I think our education system that we have that we most of us walk into, especially with public schools, we walk into it. And I think it makes us dumber, because I listen to our kids talk. They’re five and seven years old. I’m hearing what comes out of their mouth. They sound like professors sometimes. And it’s odd. So it’s like, what I know I was really smart as a kid. But when I went into school, the way that they taught everything wasn’t

Jessica linn
good for me, they dumb it down. And if kids are just little sponges, so how you talk to them is what you’re going to see come out of them. So if you talk to them, like an intelligent being their concert, Simon like smart kids, if you talk to him like an idiot, I mean there

Joshua T Berglan
there’s that and then there’s the fact that we have more children that at least from what I can tell, we have more children that have quote unquote, special needs and whether it’s autism, whether could be di D or borderline personality disorder, or there’s even depression, you know, there’s often over diagnose ADHD, there’s all of these different things. But also the other factors that we have to look at, that are changing the way children are being are being brought up is what their family dynamic dynamic is like more parents are divorced. We have it’s just crazy that there’s it seems like all the warfare that’s going on in the world. And it’s tough enough being an adult, but it seems like there’s an attack that’s blatant on our kids. And I don’t know if it’s what’s in our food. I don’t know if it’s what we’re being taught. I don’t know. So anyway, with all that said, I am super excited for you guys to have Dr. For I’m excited for this one for myself. But also I think you guys are gonna really really enjoy this interview as well. She is a fantastic woman, and from what we can tell and she’s up to amazing things and I can’t wait to learn more about her with you. We’ll be right back after this very quick message.

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well, we’re back by computer is trying to get me to perform security as we speak. What is going on? Okay, now Oh, my goodness, all these things that happened during recording. So much fun. But this is a digital age. And you’re not going to remember that I screwed this up anyway. So ladies and gentlemen, again, this is an absolute honor. I was just really looking at her extensive education. And I just hope I’m smart enough to come up with the right questions. I’m really gonna need God on this one. Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome the one the only Dr. Kristen Eccleston.

Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston
Hello. Hello, thank you so much for having me. I’m so excited to be here.

Joshua T Berglan
Well, I’m excited to have you. And I’m just I, I don’t even know where to start. But while I know where we’ll start with the first thing I asked everybody, and the only thing that’s ever planned, what are you grateful for today? And why?

Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston
You know, I think I’m most grateful for you all right now for giving me the opportunity to have a platform to really share a message that’s important to me, talking about mental health, especially mental health and education and with youth is really important. It’s something that I don’t think is talked about enough. So I am grateful that you were willing to allow me to come on your show, and share my message with everyone. So thank you.

Joshua T Berglan
I appreciate that gratitude. Yeah, um, so why why specialize with kids? Like, what was it about working with the youth, because your education is extensive, like, it’s not easy to get one degree. You got a bunch. And you’ve really dedicated yourself to this, this this practice and understanding children, the youth and and with that, I would imagine the desire to make children better. So we make the world a better place. Why? Why did you choose children?

Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston
Absolutely, you know, so I think it has to go back a little bit to my youth. And the fact that I’m an individual with ADHD didn’t know I had ADHD until I was an adult. So I spent most of my life going through school, struggling in school, trying to mask that I was having struggles in school and not really feeling great about myself as a learner and who I was, and it took a lot of my young adulthood into my adulthood to really overcome that. And so when I had the opportunity to become a special education teacher, I really loved that I got to work with kids and connect with kids and take some of my own personal experiences and apply that to them. Really knowing how they feel about school, how maybe some of their dislikes or their disinterest, I could really relate to it. And so I think that’s really how I got connected with youth and just feeling that it was really making a difference. I think so, so many times as a teacher, you hope that you get the opportunity to have that one student that you know, you made a difference in. And I have to say I am very blessed and very grateful to know that I had more than one in my my career or my profession as a teacher and I just, I’m so grateful for that. And being able to see their growth and the difference that having that one person in their corner or that one person who believed in them could make in their life was really meaningful to me and I wanted to make that larger scale. And as I went through my career as a special education teacher, I eventually had the opportunity to create a pro grants specifically for students who needed a higher level of academic care. And when I first first went into that experience, I wasn’t sure what that was going to look like. And I had a wonderful team of individuals around me. And it ended up being the creation of a program specifically for students with mental health needs. So those internalizing students, those students who are often overlooked because they’re not that squeaky wheel, they’re not throwing desk or getting attention. They’re the students who are school avoidant, right, they they fall into the background, maybe they don’t have. They don’t have great connections with teachers, it’s so easy to forget, they’re there, they stopped going to school, maybe they could be a plus students, but they’re getting C grade. So nobody’s getting this red flag kind of vibe from them. And those were my students who I really wanted to make sure had extra care, something special associated just for them at school. And I that was kind of my crusade for mental health. That’s why I went back and got my doctorate looking specifically at mental health in the education setting, and just making sure that students could graduate from high school feeling like, they know how awesome how amazing they are, that if high school was their thing wasn’t their thing that didn’t define who they were as an individual, and they could go out and find success and happiness in the world.

Joshua T Berglan
I’ve one of my favorite authors is Malcolm Gladwell. And I had I was a troubled kid who sexually and physically abused and so mentally, which I know now, which was, you know, di D is what I made all developed into. But I had other issues to hyperactivity. I mean, it was all the work. So it was seemed like it was, here’s the bag of struggles you are going to get mentally. So I hated school. And I always thought I was done. I didn’t fit in, had trouble sitting in class couldn’t pay attention, with all the things. And and when I read the words would dance around the page. And what I later learned was dyslexia. Well, it took until partying my way out of college to realize, Oh, I’m smart. I just need to learn differently. Yeah, I wish now looking back at it, because now I’m a sponge. I mean, I have books all over this house. I taught myself to code. I taught myself all these different things to do with media. And I’m now I know, I’m a really smart guy. But the education system that I was born into, made me feel like a freaking idiot. And I didn’t feel like I belonged. I felt dumb. When I stuttered, when I read out loud, all, again, all of these little things, and come to find out really, if I was just taught differently, I would have been able to pick up on it quicker. What is it that why is it that we the school system has this one size fits all approach to teaching, when we know we’re all different?

Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston
Absolutely. So if you actually want the real answer to it is we’re still working in an outdated operating system. A long, long time ago, when you had people in power, like the Rockefellers, who were able to get on education boards and say, This is how we were going to fund these types of educational programming. And this is what it’s going to look like, is because they were trying to create little factory workers, right, they wanted a little people lined up in desks, here’s a bell, raise your hand, you move to the next thing that you’re supposed to go to, we’re still working in that operating system, we’ve never moved out of it. There’s this great YouTube video, and I’m blanking on the name of it, but this person goes through. If you look at what a car looked like, 50 years ago, what does it look like today, a phone and so on. And then you look at a classroom, nothing has changed. We’ve not updated it, we know so much more about the brain and how the brain works. But we’ve done nothing to change how we are giving education out to students. And one of the saddest things, and you touched on this and it just breaks my heart is you have so many kids who are neurodivergent, or struggling with mental health and, and I truly think of a lot of people who are neurodivergent to be incredibly smart, like the world changer type of individuals, the ones who could cure cancer, and we have made them feel like they are so for lack of a better word stupid or not capable or not not as smart as their peers, when really they’re the ones who are going to be able to make huge changes in our world. But they don’t realize it until later like you said as an adult. Now I know I’m not stupid. Now I know I’m a sponge. Now I know I can do all these things. But they lost so much of their youth in their young 20s where they didn’t have that confidence and missed out on opportunities because for a long time they didn’t think they were capable or didn’t know they were capable. Because school wasn’t being taught to who they were as a learner. They were told you have to fit into this box or you’re not. You’re not as smart as your peers and then you see that you see other people being six is full in that box and you think, Well, what’s wrong with me that I can’t do it. And then you’re right, it comes down to had I been taught a different way had I’d had opportunities to experience or grow or have topics of interest, I would have come out of school of much different person. And I think there were so many students who fall into that category. And it’s just sad that we are creating this, this society or this box for students where it takes them so long to be able to come out the other end, if they come out the other end, knowing I’m actually much more capable than I ever thought I was.

Jessica linn
It seems like they’re more concerned right now at at teaching kids how to listen to adults how to follow direction, not how to grow what they already have inside of them into what it’s supposed to be. And I mean, for our own kids, it’s so discouraging to hear what they learn if they can even think of what they’ve learned, which I mean, Joshua every time, every time it’s Oh, our oldest is seven. So she hates school. She likes recess, she didn’t, she told me not to tell her teacher, because she doesn’t want her teacher like she, she wants to appear to be like the perfect kid when she’s at school. But she hates being there.

Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston
It’s heartbreaking. It is heartbreaking. And it’s because we are keeping kids back from we’re natural explorers, right? We want to be able to explore and and, and be kinesthetic and hands-on and in school. There are components of that, but it’s not how we are really going forward with with teaching students and you ask the question of why is it that we’re just making them complacent, and just listening to adults and responding to them and not essentially taking away some of that critical thinking skill? But again, I think it goes back to that old outdated operating system is, that’s how people in power wanted kids to be right? We wanted you to come out of school and be my employee and make me more money. Don’t question me Don’t Don’t question my authority, just make me more money. And in that, it’s something that I think we now know, is outdated. But we haven’t quite woken up and are tuned to that. So we’re still okay, kind of going along the operating system. Because in theory, there are still people who benefit from having other people who are making them money. And, and that’s not usually the platform that I push when I’m talking about mental health and education. But I definitely think it’s something that needs to be considered when we’re looking at how school is structured, and how we are really limiting individuals from being entrepreneurs or having creative ideas or being successful. And even just look at the type of subjects that are being taught in school. Well, and they can’t

Jessica linn
they, they, so the school that our kids go to, they’ve been in the news for like, horrible things recently, like racist remarks at all, all these sporting events of the just awful things. Um, so one of our daughters came home singing, she was so excited to show me the song she learned. And it had hand motions, and it very simply referred to white people being better than people from different continents

Joshua T Berglan
mocking other ethnic ethnicities. And

Jessica linn
so of course, I sent an email one of my many emails that they try to avoid, because they don’t, they don’t have a solution. They send me these links to how they’re going to handle it. But ultimately, I read all the length, and it’s just saying, Oh, yes, everyone’s important. This is we care about you. But there’s no actionable steps on there’s I think 2% minority and our girls school, there’s no actionable steps for the children that are not the minority to teach them. Real life.

Joshua T Berglan
What Yeah, so the the question that I pull out of that for you, is in a, we have a lot of segregated schools still, whether that’s just by the small town that you live in, whatever it may be, but what kind of damage with all the stuff that comes out of the news and pushing the different movements in the different agendas. But yet here it is in your little community of people, you’re all white people, but yet you’re seeing these different agendas and different movements and people bringing attention to racism as they should. Maybe not in the manner of the some of its gone about but nonetheless, there it is an issue it’s an attack, what kind of psychological damage is it doing to the children by not being well? by being in segregated schools, and but at the same time hearing all this different stuff about what’s happening to the races when everything that can see around them is someone that looks like that prime example. Our children when they come to where we’re at they because they’ll spend some time with them a week with their dad and then a week here in there around more races, they’re around Indian people, they’re around African people with around Muslims, they’re all They’re around, more color more, more life, if you ask me in that messes with their minds as parents, what can we do, like say we’re in that situation, and there’s other parents listening that are in this situation, that are dealing with the same thing she just brought up? What are some things parents can do to help their children with the understanding that people look differently, and that’s perfectly okay.

Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston
All about having conversations with your children, I’m going to be very honest. So I grew up in a very diverse area. So you know, it was funny, I had friends of all different colors. And it wasn’t something I really thought about. And as we got older, my husband and I ended up in a, a community that happens to be more predominantly white, not choice, just circumstances. And it’s funny, we, we have students of color in my children’s school. And it’s something that we’ve always tried did not make a thing like your, your friends or your friends, it doesn’t matter what their skin color looks like, it doesn’t matter what their background looks like, I never wanted to draw any kind of attention to it, because I never wanted skin color to be a determining factor of any means for my children. And so I think the message is, I’ve always tried to give my children if if they ever have pointed out race or cultural differences, is just that’s a person, that’s a person, and you should just look at them as a person, not what their skin color is not what their religion is not what their background is just as the person, are they being kind to you? Are they? Are they a good friend, are they somebody who you enjoy hanging out with or interacting with, because those are really the only factors that should really be at play here, not what they look like not where they come from, not what their parents house looks like, none of that. And that’s really been the message I’ve tried to give my children and I hope is the message that others will try to give their children because I feel like, at least in my opinion, we can’t get rid of history, we can’t get rid of the past, we can’t get rid of things that have happened that are horrible, horrible, horrible things that have happened, but we can move forward with how we are giving our children certain messages. And some of those messages I’m at least trying to give my children is we should be looking at everybody that we interact with is who they are as an individual, and not how they appear on the outside. And I’m hoping that if a generation or two generations get that messages, then hopefully that will start to be an impact that we need to see that we’re we’re looking at each other based on who we are as a person, and how we treat each other and not how we can look

Jessica linn
at well, I would say that’s exactly how our philosophy unknowingly, maybe it has been up until recently, recently, now that they’re both been in school all year. And with all the issues there, it’s kind of like, like a rubber band, it feels like when they go we have to fix everything when they get back. And then they go there. And it’s clear that there is an abundance of racism and the homes of their friends. So how do you how do you handle

Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston
that? That’s a really great question. Because unfortunately, a lot of that comes from home. A lot of that comes. And those are the messages that, you know, you’re giving your child the same message, it sounds like I’m giving mine if we look at the person for the person and not what they look like, but that’s obviously not what’s happening at home. And that that becomes a large factor in so many different things in race and mental health than just in how you operate as a family unit or system. Right. You can’t control the messages that are happening in other people’s households. And then your child goes to school with kids who get different messages or different value statements right than what you’re being provided in your household. And that and that’s hard. So I think in certain situations or circumstances or situations like that, the best thing you can do is to have conversations with your child and explain to them that there are some people out there who and I wouldn’t I wouldn’t use ugly language because I feel like that’s just perpetuating the cycle. But using the people have personal biases because that’s what it is personal biases that they have been experienced or gone through in their life that have only led them to a certain point of knowledge because you don’t know what you don’t know. And because you have these personal bias SS, you see the world a certain way. And the most important thing, to me, at least in every individual is, you have to know that you have limitations on your knowledge. Everybody does. You don’t know what you don’t know. And you have to be open to saying, I don’t know everything. And that’s why I want to hear other people’s opinions. That’s why I want to hear other people’s experiences. Because I’m looking for those, ah, I never thought of it that way moments, or that’s really interesting. I’ve never had to experience that in my life. So now that I’m hearing it from somebody who has, now I understand better, or now I’m more clearer in my thinking. And that’s called transformation, right? That’s a transformation way of thinking of knowing I don’t know everything, but I’m not elevated my knowledge. And your your goal in life really should be to keep elevating your level of knowledge, right? opening yourself to other people’s opinions, other people’s perspectives, and keep growing, as somebody who sees the world as this big thing of just forever growth right and not become stagnant in your thoughts. I think sometimes we want to say to people that, oh, you’ve changed your mind, or you used to think this way, and that it’s negative that you’ve changed, or it shouldn’t be, now have new information, you now have seen something from a new perspective. And as a result, you have shifted your mindset, you have more knowledge, or a better understanding than what you previously had, when you previously thought something different. And so I think that’s something that you need to explain to your children is some people get very stuck and very limited, they have their personal biases. And instead of allowing themselves to be open to learning more, or having a deeper understanding, they send to become stagnant and cut themselves off from that growth. And you can’t control people who are like that. And it’s unfortunate, you just can’t, hopefully, they’ll have a moment of growth, or a moment of clarity that allows them to see something more but until then, all you can do is know that you don’t align with those views, and that you want to be open to better understanding others. Right? We

Joshua T Berglan
it that is really beautiful. And we’ve made the choice, at least in our world, together as parents, and ever since I’ve come in the kid’s life, especially I’m not I’m not taking credit for this. But like since we’ve met and like I’ve been involved when we got married, you know, one thing that we’ve really been, in, really, it seems at times, like we’re doing the wrong thing, but we’ve decided to be boldly honest about everything with our children, including, you know, I have a pretty crazy past and having di D in fact, my D ID as much as I had healed from it. I carried over some of this into the relationship. So our first couple of years have been it’s been an adventure, where I’ve had episodes where I’ve been different people. And then here’s the thing that kids can pick up on. And we made the decision to be honest, and have that mental health conversation with them about what happened. So they know. And they asked how it happened. Well, I told them, I mean, I dumbed down the, you know, the language and in the description, of course of what the abuse was. But we did explain that sexual abuse does happen. We didn’t explain the physical abuse happens. And so we’d have this approach with them. And I like it, because it’s really I mean, again, they’re five and seven. And there’s a times I’m going oh my god, if we told them too much if we opened up their eyes to a world that they didn’t need to see. But I guess the reason I’m bringing this up is, is it good? Like we’re at that age of five to seven to have these honest conversations? And what about race and racism? But also, I like to I don’t like to say mental illness, I like to say mental uniqueness. Because it does. It makes you quite unique. And I believe that some mental illnesses can be considered gifts. Like I look at my D ID, especially now that I’m healed from it as a gift. Yeah, how I got it wasn’t, but it’s allowed me to see in a world and you brought up the Rockefellers and we could spend four hours there. It’s allowed me to see the world almost with a 360 view. And I like that, is it damn, is it more damaging to be just upfront and honest with kids at age or to keep pretending that there’s really an Easter Bunny? And a really a freakin Santa Claus?

Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston
I think that’s a great question. And so I’m very fortunate in my life, that I have people who are my friends who have very different beliefs than I do. But we’re able to come together and really kind of debate our viewpoints in a way that’s like a loving, respectful way and still love each other at the end of the conversation and it not be this ugly thing and I actually happen to have had that exact question come up with somebody who I trust very We march and we talked through this. And I think where we landed at the end of hashing it out for almost an hour was, you really have to know your kids, you have to know who your kids are, and what they’re capable because there are some kids who, at a very young age, are very ready for complex thoughts and complex things. And given the setting that they live in, or what their family has been exposed to, it’s important for them to have that opportunity to have had things explained to them or brought up to them. And then there are kids who psychologically, aren’t ready for that some of the concepts are too complex, it just clouds their mind a little bit more, it makes it complicated for them, it puts thoughts or ideas in their heads that they now use. Some children use as a manipulation factor, or they’re, they’re saying things but they really don’t understand the concept or the meaning of it. So after really debating that, that concept with my friend for an hour, we really just landed at knowing your kids is really what it comes down to. And so you as the parent need to establish great relationships with your kids know who your kid is, know what they can take in and they can comprehend and understand and what they can’t what’s too much for them. Because I do think that you could have the same seven year old, right, you could have two different seven year olds in front of you. And you could share a concept and one is going to be very okay, I get it, I understand it, my family has been exposed to this, this is a concept I get, and another one who’s just not psychologically mature enough to process the concept. So it really comes down to knowing your kid and knowing your family dynamic and what is going to be most healthy for you. Because there might be times where a very complex situation should be told to your child, because otherwise they don’t understand what’s happening. And it’s scarier for them than rather than having an understanding of what they’re experiencing and going on. So I think you have to look at it circumstance by circumstance and then who your child is as an individual.

Jessica linn
I think that’s a perfect answer. And I think both of our daughters seem to thrive once we just tell them the truth. They I mean,

Joshua T Berglan
they didn’t like to use her body and one though, well.

Jessica linn
You can still we can still like hide ads. Okay. But that was a real big deal that historically, what happened was, and then we tell them, and then I forgot that I told them that we could still hide eggs, because then that led to a meltdown. And then I remembered and we were good. But here’s my next question is well, because I feel like where they’re at school and everything they’re surrounded by I feel like we have to work extra hard to instill more wisdom in them. But how can a parent communicate effectively with a school that has this sort of mentality and has such a? I mean, they really do avoid answering my emails, unless I have a question after I tell them about this racist song my kid learned at school. Oh, how do you address it in a way that will get actionable reaction?

Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston
So I would actually in those circumstances, at the end of your email, put in questions in there, I would like to know what your plan is to address this concern. I would like to know what the school is doing right now to ensure that this doesn’t continue. I would like to hear what your plans are. So so put it back on them that you’re not just say, Hey, I’m making you aware of the circumstance, because then there’s no request for an action at that, right. You’ve, you’ve told them and okay, I’ve read this email, and I’m done with it. But if you specifically say I want to know what you’re doing, what is your plan? How are you addressing this? What is this going to look like? Then you’re asking for them to give you specific feedback on what they’re going to be doing. And if you still feel ignored after that, then I wouldn’t be afraid to to elevate your concern. Usually, most school systems have some form of central office, depending even if it’s a smaller school system, some form of central office, units of diversity, equity and inclusion usually are somewhere in each school system. So if you feel like you’re not getting the appropriate response, I would bring in whoever that person is in charge of that department for the school system into the conversation as well because it’s not so much for them to just gloss over it. That’s a real concern that you have as a parent, and it’s a real concern, especially what’s going on climate wise and society wise. And so you would like to know specifically what their course of action is going to be.

Jessica linn
I mean, it sounds very reasonable, how you’re wording that they have sent me the links to how they’re handling, there’s two lakes, I’m pretty positive, it’s a small town, I don’t think they have anybody, like the principal offered to call me and explain it to me. But it’s the same. It’s just, it’s full. It, it’s just kind of a glazed over response to a real problem. And I went to the superintendent, and it’s all just, Oh, is there someone from the outside you can involve?

Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston
Up. So if you ever feel like it’s getting to that point, don’t there’s always a state board of education, usually as well, too. So if you feel like your district is smaller, and so they don’t maybe have the resources or the people who can be who could answer to this, go to the state level, because they’re all of these positions at the State Board of Education as well, too. So bring somebody in from the state, usually, the state would have to get involved with the school district,

Joshua T Berglan
they’re gonna be, they’re gonna kick out a school, you know, they’re not gonna make it out of the year

Jessica linn
to get kicked out, because I mean, I feel like they’re just turning my children and making that be

Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston
kicked out, you are protected by faith, free and appropriate public education. So there’s no kicking out there. And this is a real, I mean, a real issue, especially if you’re talking about racism, I would find it very hard to believe that if it got pointed out, media wise that your children were kicked out of school because you stood up for racism. I don’t think there’s going to be a lot of people who are on board mark now.

Joshua T Berglan
Oh, you just gave her a license that you would believe already been? I want to I want to move the subject a little bit. To ask, I want to ask the question before I ask the real question. When I say out of your body, what is the medical term for that?

Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston
When you’re disassociate?

Joshua T Berglan
Oh, okay, there you go. So how is it so like I learned my my disassociation came through Trump. When you have a young child, though, that has no history of physical abuse, sexual abuse, things like that. Is it possible because I believe in generational curses and all that, and I don’t know if that falls into the field of psychiatry or not, but I do believe in generational curses, because I, my father’s sins became mine, but I did way worse than he did. Thank God, I broken that cycle. But when I, when you’re seeing a child disassociate, that has not been abused, or in physical, sexual abuse, anything like that. What could that come from? Is that Is it possible to come from something generationally?

Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston
So exact? Actually, you started to answer my question or answer your own question most of what I was going to say, but I call it generational trauma. And you don’t necessarily have to have had a traumatic childhood, to have had childhood trauma. And a lot of that can be from that generational trauma piece. And I consider myself somebody who finds I have amazing parents, loving parents, I had a wonderful upbringing, but I still had things that I dealt with. And it was because that generational trauma piece, and I’ll give you an example of this, so you could have somebody we’re gonna make him the grandfather, and that is example, the grandfather, who was had mental health needs no, no, in this example, mental health needs, right. And because of his own mental health needs, maybe he has parented his child in a very traumatic way, maybe very aggressive, abusive, verbally aggressive, right. So that’s how they have parented their child. So now that child is an adult and has a child. So now we’re on the third generation, right. And even though that child would the original grandparent, didn’t have mental health themselves, they learned how to parent based off the example they were given by their mentally ill parents, right. And now they are parenting their child in the same style or manner, maybe it’s aggressive, it’s abusive, it’s because that’s how they learned to be a parent. So now that child grows up to be an adult, and they do the same thing. They parent, aggressive of, you know, verbally abusive, and it becomes a generational trauma. Nobody since that original adult has had a mental health need, but everybody is acting in a way that they did, because that was how they have learned and observed how to be a parent. It’s not till finally one of those generation goes, something’s amiss here. This isn’t right. I don’t think I should be reacting this way. But that you can finally start to break that generational trauma. But it takes that level of awareness and then that willing to willingness to do something about it, and that’s just kind of one example. But that can look so many different ways that you don’t know goes back to what is If you don’t know what you don’t know, so if you don’t know that there’s any other way to parent, or there’s any other way to respond or react to a situation, you can only go what you’ve been exposed to of what you’ve learned yourself until you have an outside factor who brings to your attention that there is another way. And I think you’re seeing more and more of that generational trauma starting to be broken, because information is way more available than it’s ever been before. Right? We’re not stuck in that home, small town isolation and been, and we’re more aware that, Oh, that wasn’t normal for me to have experienced that. But you didn’t experience that as a kid. And that’s why I think it’s starting to be more of a topic and you’re seeing more people doing the work to break that.

Joshua T Berglan
That’s, I love that. And you know, the thing, you bring something up too, I spent so much of my life hating my father and all that hatred, just, you know, poisoned my soul poisoned my spirit. And it fed a lot of the angst in my I was a chem sex addict for 20 years, I found that was my comfort, it was that. But when I turned my life around one of the realizations that I had in this moment of when I go screaming and cursing a God about why he would fix me and change me after trying all this stuff, and I heard you have to forgive your father. Am I supposed to do that? Because that happened to him, too. And whether that was God, my subconscious what I don’t know, but I take it because of the preceding things that happened, that it was definitely God. When that realization hit me, all of a sudden, I was able to have compassion for my father, which set the stage for me to be able to forgive. And it was going, he learned it from somewhere. The same way the guys that molested me, the women, all of that. And that was really profound for me, because you’re right, our parents, like I can see now all the amazing things that I learned from my father, I mean, no, there’s still things that I go, he probably shouldn’t have done that. But he learned it from somewhere. And now I’m able to see through the healing journey, which there’s a lot of layers to that, as you know. But now I’m able to only see the value and the great things that he brought to my life. And I can appreciate the challenging stuff now, where before just fueled my hatred. So I really love that you said that?

Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston
No, I’m glad. I’m glad. Because I think I think that applies to a lot of people. It’s not until you take a minute to go, why would they like that, and you realize, oh, they had this experience, or their parent had gone through this experience that probably bled into how they parented and I’m not saying any excuses, but again, it goes back to you don’t know what you don’t know, you are going based off the example that was provided to you. And, and oftentimes, I think, especially as children, we forget that our parents had a whole life prior to us being present that was probably filled with incidences, or traumas or events, that that unfortunately, at times does bleed into then who they are as a parent. So I’m glad that that was impactful, because I do believe truly, that that is a lot of what happens. And you don’t necessarily have to have had a traumatic childhood, to have had childhood trauma. If you were still dealing with generational issues of people not knowing what they didn’t know, and continuing cycles that existed maybe three or four generations ago, even.

Joshua T Berglan
Let me I want to ask you something, too. And I hope that this is not an offensive question at all. Are you are you? Are you a psychiatrist or psychologist?

Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston
So I’m actually a background in education, or mental health, specifically mental health and education. So you’re

Joshua T Berglan
not so you’re you’re not into prescribing the medications and things I do

Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston
not I do not I am. So my process or my background, specifically neuro processing of how our brain learns. So that’s a little bit of why I’m able to talk on that is, I am able to specifically see how our brain makes the connections to the different things that we experience and observe.

Joshua T Berglan
So you believe that we can heal ourselves, then.

Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston
I do think we have that ability. But I think it takes a level of awareness. Like I said, you can’t be stuck in that stagnant. My you know, going back to personal bias, you can’t be this is where I’m at, this is what I know. And I don’t want to know any more than here. You have to constantly be open to saying I don’t know everything. And I’m going to keep receiving and keep building and keep developing my perspective and how I view things and how I see things based on the information that’s coming in. And that’s, that’s there’s a theory called transformational learning theory, Jack Bezer. Who is the theorists behind that and I believe strongly in that theory that we can constantly be changing what Our understanding of things, five new knowledge that we’re taking in

Joshua T Berglan
to prove your point how I healed from di D initially, was retraining my triggers. That was a big part of it. And of course, then you I mean, there’s there were so many more steps after that. And it was a process. But it started with retraining my triggers because it would keep me from switching, like learning to do that. And then slowly but surely became more present to where I was able to see. And then of course, the fun, which was the last few months, actually. So it’s really I

Jessica linn
have the last few months. Yeah, yeah, I got to the last few months, I got to work on healing. And I realized that I was disassociating by default, when things were uncomfortable. So I mean, it’s crazy, what you become aware of what God will tell you, when you’re open to it, and it sucks. It’s hard work to go through. But then when it gets to the other side, it’s just, it’s amazing what you’ll figure out,

Joshua T Berglan
she was a huge help to because she never let me penetrate her boundaries. So when she would see me switch, or see one of the other alters, show up in the shoot, no, it wasn’t me, she would shut down and go, like she, we develop, I shouldn’t say we you did it. But I honored your boundaries. Somehow that happened, because I’ve never respected anyone’s boundaries before. But that healing process, when God brought us together, it started with her literally holding her boundaries, holding me accountable. And if she saw me even try to pretend to be someone different than I was, she was out. It was wild. But that helped me become more aware also. And I believe that that’s how ultimately I healed I’m not going to say that I may not switch it on two hours. But I haven’t switched in months. And I and the beauty is I got to learn coping skills at 42 years. Which has been fun, but I’m grateful for. So I love the fact that you come from this mindset, because, you know, I was prescribed eight different medications at one time. And like I went through all that funk in one day, which I don’t recommend audience at all do not do this. I did it. And it was crazy. But I just stopped taking all my medication at one time.

Jessica linn
I did that too. And that

Joshua T Berglan
I don’t recommend it. But that’s what I did in that moment. And I had to ride out the crazy. But it ultimately end up working. And it’s what helped me heal. So I think it’s really, really cool that you you know, you approach mental health from this manner through education and teaching and things need more people

Jessica linn
like you are needed. Exactly now.

Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston
Well, I appreciate that. I think my biggest message is I don’t want anybody to ever feel like they’re lost cause or there’s no hope for them. Or that things couldn’t change for them. I have had trauma in my life. I’ve had bad experiences in my life. I have things that have felt like how am I going to move on from this in my life. And it’s hard. And I’m not saying it’s easy, or it’s even an enjoyable experience to go through. But I think, but often you just have to have that hope. And that hope and and the universe, God, whoever your your power is or where your power comes from, because I really I try not to be you got to find what works for you, right? I grew up religious, but you got to find what works for you. And hold on to that. And know that that power will bring you to the resources, the people, the experiences in your life. But sometimes you have to go through some of those changes for a couple of different reasons, one, so you can appreciate when the good comes. And two, it’s a growth, it truly is a growth that’s going to help you get out of whatever stagnant place that you’re in. Because we as human beings don’t like change, our brain doesn’t like change. Our brain wants to protect us change is a scary thing. Its job is to keep us alive, as long as we’re alive. Even if we’re in a bad situation, our brain goes, well, you’re live. So it can’t be that bad, right? So sometimes these circumstances come into our lives or these scenarios or these bad situations, because it’s a way to force us to move to not be stagnant to have to embrace the change that we may otherwise not have wanted to go through. And so I feel like once we can accept that and know that will we’re going to have to deal with difficulties in our life. But know that you always have the ability to transform who you are. You always have people who are willing to accept you support you and that you’re you don’t have to remain stagnant. I truly believe that people even people who have done bad things in their life, there’s redemption, there’s an opportunity to come I’m back. And I really hate when we feel like we’ve made people feel like there’s no coming back from your mistakes, right? Because I think we often forget that if that’s the message, we’re going to get given people that you can’t come back from your mistakes, then why would they ever decide to come back from them? Why would they ever put the effort into coming back from them? So I’m going on a different topic, but you know, it’s

Jessica linn
great.

Joshua T Berglan
It’s the perfect topic, especially for our audience. Because, you know, this is it’s a very diverse group, but most of them were we aligned as mental uniqueness. Former addicts, former junkies, we have former porn stars, prostitutes, drug traffickers, you name it. It’s a very Muslim, atheist, bisexual, transgender, we have a very diverse audience and I I love it because they hear we talk about Jesus, but that same time, all have Muslims and atheists. I don’t. Because what you were saying before, you don’t know what you don’t know. And if your faith and I believe this with all my heart, how great is your faith, if it can’t be challenged, like that’s part of building your faith muscles having a challenge. But I want different points of view. I love learning from different people. And I And I’ll never apologize for that. I love it. I love my Muslim friends, I love my Buddhist friends, or hindered neighbor, friends next door, love them. And I’m not going to judge them based on their beliefs. Because you know, what, if if we’re here to love and be loved, and to use our gifts to bless other people, and I’m seeing someone do it, I don’t need to know who they worship. I don’t care. It’s none of my business. Because worship is a personal thing. My relationship with God is a personal thing, even though I talk about it. It is still personal. You know, like, I love this about people. And I love different approaches, because we don’t know it all. I remember when I was homeless, I read vision, Linda Carney’s book, code of extraordinary mind. And that was the very first book and I’d never read anything like it in my life. I grew up Baptist Church couldn’t stand it hated, it still became a drug addict anyway, like, none of that it didn’t help me. But when I read code of the extraordinary mind, it made me go for the very first time in my life, I’m 36 years old, go, Oh, I’m not crazy. All of those things that I’m seeing in my head are what’s possible. Not, I belong in an insane asylum. And that was a life changing. And this is a guy in his book, that’s mocking religion. Okay, I’m okay with that. Alan Watts is my favorite philosopher. Not exactly a Christian. So I love these. I love the different points of view. I like you’re right. And here’s the other thing, too, that we’re all waking up to. Most of what we’ve been told our life has been full of crap. Anyway. It’s all been a lie. We’ve had we have over 60 books removed from the Bible. So it’s not even the complete book. We’ve had we have we’ve been women weren’t allowed to vote. We really, if we knew the true history of Africa, we probably wouldn’t act the way we’re acting now as white people. I mean, there’s just a lot there that is going to come uncovered. And we’ve all been a victim to it. We’ve all been born into some version of propaganda. And it’s no wonder everyone’s so confused. So I’m going to ask you something. And then I want to hear about your amazing developmental center that you have. What? Ha just lost it dad gum, and it was such a good question. And a beautiful segue. And I lost a mental note before that. Oh, I feel like that happens to be the drugs I did a long time ago. What out?

Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston
Hey, ADHD, this happens to me all the time. So I understand. I’m there with you.

Joshua T Berglan
Anyway, I, that really sucks. No, I’ll probably come to me later. Can you tell us about your passion project? Because when I started to read about it, I got really excited. And I could just started to do. I started to envision franchises of this all over the world, because it seems so important, especially in a world where everyone has been gaslit to hell, especially our youth. Our youth feel like they are a victim of some kind of crazy psychological operation. And it rips my heart out right now. And when I was reading about your center, I thought this is the future. This is how we’re going to heal kids. So can you please talk about it?

Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston
Sure. So it stems from a program that I was part of making several years ago and I feel strongly that I really want the opportunity to help schools develop an opportunity for students to come in and have a different way of being exposed. to learning and development, one that takes into account their mental health, their well being, they’re being neurodivergent. It’s not that one size fits all box, it’s really an individualized way of learning and most school systems, what they don’t realize there is a law that’s free and appropriate public education. And if a school system cannot meet the needs of a child, they end up having to pay for private placements of schools that can meet the child’s needs. And that costs school systems upwards of set like 4 million 10 million, I mean, millions of dollars a year in having to pay for private placements for students, instead of restructuring the education setting that they have, and making it so that they can be inclusive of the students that they have. And so my passion project really turns to wanting to go to different states, different counties, and even around the world. And helping them develop a program that I know is a great program that I’ve used in the past that children did find success in. But it’s not a one size fits all program. But even with that being said, you can serve upwards of 5860 students and still make it individualized and have it be successful within a public school system. And that’s my passion. I want to help public school systems, show them how they can help serve the students within their own walls, giving them certified teachers access to curriculum with doing it in a way that is tailored for students that will help them feel Pat empowered, successful, and really embrace who they are as a learner, which that is something

Joshua T Berglan
which basically, that’s code for knowing their identity, and learning their identity and getting comfortable with it early. Because the one thing I will say that change was a game changer for me, was when I just accepted and realized who I was, and just acted accordingly. When I quit caring what other people thought I was so comfortable with who I was created to be in getting to be that it took a lot of pressure off because we tried to fit in and be like other people didn’t work so well. And society is like really kind of forcing and it was like that when we were kids to where you want to be like the movie star you want to be that? No, you really don’t. And I’ve been able to see that. Fortunately, I got behind the scenes look, working in the entertainment industry and like seeing what that really is and the facade that it is. It was kind of disappointing, honestly, because I had you know, like it stars in my eyes and thought that this is the was everything. And then reality struck and was like, Yeah, I just want to be me. Because being getting to be me is pretty freakin awesome. things about having a relationship with God is that I do know that I was uniquely made. So why in the hell would I want to be like someone else when me is extraordinary enough. Other people may not agree with it. But I think my wife does. So I’m okay.

Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston
I agree. And that’s one of the biggest challenges kids have right now. They’re just, they’re so afraid of being different and being seen different, and then almost to the detriment of themselves. And that’s my biggest message that I want for our youth especially it’s embrace your individuality, that you were beautiful and wonderful as you are just as you are and there isn’t this need to have to be like everybody else or blend in with everybody else.

Unknown Speaker
I love it. That’s

Joshua T Berglan
beautiful. You if the public schools and have fallen apart for whatever reason, we’re gonna go bigger than that. Well, yeah, we so as we’re a foundation, we’re nonprofit media organization, but we have our own Broadcasting Network and things like that. But we have a mission for the youth and especially troubled kids, inner city kids, because of what what their schools are like, they’re not exactly being taught and of course, and then culturally or in their community, if they want to rise up and be something well greater than what their parents are. They’re shunned by their own family, like so we want to develop and I’m sure you’re familiar with the Boys and Girls Clubs. One of the things that we’re doing as an organization that we’re working towards is building these community centers that are like the Boys and Girls Clubs. But it’s also teaching media, because media, if you don’t know media, in coming into the fourth industrial revolution, you don’t really have a shot. That’s just the way it is. But we won’t go into that sermon right now. But we all know that that safe place for former trafficking victims abuse victims, and just youth in general, having a safe place to be able to go to play to learn, but also I know that why know this from my own experience and where I got the vision for this was the realization that when a kid feel safe, they’re gonna talk. Yes, they’re going to share everything with you. They may not talk to their parents, they may not talk to their teacher, but when they feel safe, it’s going to come out of them one way or the other. And so one of the things that was super important in these community centers that we’re building is that we want to have somebody like yourself there, and other other teachers that can help that can bring in the, the things that they need to help them because if you can break the cycle, it’s a lot easier to heal a wounded child than a grown ass man. Yes, that journey was hell. So that’s part of our vision. So if it doesn’t work out with the public schools, give us a call, because I’m in the lab everywhere. So I’m out of you. And I’m not terrified of you. Because I was like, if she’s a psychiatrist, she’s not gonna like what I have to say.

Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston
Very different perspective. I think we had a great conversation, and I appreciate your time and allowing me to share my thoughts and opinions.

Joshua T Berglan
Well, I’m really grateful that you’re here. Please, please tell everybody where they can follow you. And of course, in the media kit, we publish we’re going to have all of your links and everything there, but tell the audience where they can support you.

Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston
Absolutely. Please come and find me on Tik Tok on Instagram at the dot neurodiverse dot teacher. Same thing, the website WWE dot the neurodiverse teacher.com. So I really have enjoyed the time getting to chat with you. This has been really insightful. So thank you so much.

Joshua T Berglan
Thank you, Dr. Allison.

Dr. Kristen C. Eccleston
Take care you too. Bye, everyone.

Jessica linn
That was so cool. I needed that just as a mom.

Joshua T Berglan
That’s why I invited you to pay no, you’re the pretty

Jessica linn
Thank you. I know the next steps to get my kids what they need when they’re in school

Joshua T Berglan
going to the top everyone’s scared of me but they have no idea should be scared of me. Thank you guys so much for being here. God bless you and we will see you next time.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai